Fandom

Abuse Wiki

List of war apology statements issued by Japan

3,996pages on
this wiki
Add New Page
Talk0 Share
This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors).

Template:Use mdy dates The list of war apology statements issued by Japan stretches across the decades after the Second World War was concluded.

At the end of the Pacific War, the Japanese accepted the terms of the Potsdam Declaration. In 1945, unconditional surrender was formally confirmed about the USS Missouri. General Douglas MacArthur was named Supreme Commander of the Allied Powers (SCAP) in Japan.[1]

When Gen. MacArthur first met Emperor Hirohito, the Japanese sovereign is reported to have said: "I come before you to offer myself to the judgment of the powers you represent, as one to bear sole responsibility for every political and military decision made and action taken by my people in the conduct of the war."[2]

According to popular historian Herbert Bix in Hirohito and the Making of Modern Japan, "MacArthur's truly extraordinary measures to save Hirohito from trial as a war criminal had a lasting and profoundly distorting impact on Japanese understanding of the lost war."[3] Among the consequences of MacArthur's decision-making are continuing controversies surrounding the issues of apology.

Demands for an apology and compensation have been a recurring topic in Korean and China politics. As of 2010, 24% of South Koreans still feel that Japan has never apologized for its colonial rule, while another 58% believe Japan has not apologized sufficiently.[4]

Apology rebuffedEdit

Toward the end of the Occupation of Japan, Emperor Hirohito let it be known to SCAP that he was prepared to apologize formally to Gen. MacArthur for Japan's actions during World War II—including an apology for the December 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor.[5]

Patrick Lennox Tierney was an eye-witness on the day the Emperor came to SAP headquarters to present this apology. When the emperor arrived, MacArthur refused to admit him or acknowledge him. When this happened, Tierney was in his office on the fifth floor of the Dai-Ichi Insurance Building in Tokyo. This was the same floor where MacArthur's suite was situated.[5]

The pivotal moment passed. Many years later, Tierney made an effort to explain his understanding of the significance of what he had personally witnessed: "Apology is a very important thing in Japan."[5] Issues which might have been addressed were allowed to remain open, and unanticipated consequences have unfolded across the decades since then.[6]

1950sEdit

  • 1957. Prime Minister Kishi Nobusuke. "We view with deep regret the vexation we caused to the people of Burma in the war just passed. In a desire to atone, if only partially, for the pain suffered, Japan is prepared to meet fully and with goodwill its obligations for war reparations. The Japan of today is not the Japan of the past, but, as its Constitution indicates, is a peace-loving nation."[7]
  • 1957. Prime Minister Kishi Nobusuke. "It is my official duty, and my personal desire, to express to you and through you to the people of Australia, our heartfelt sorrow for what occurred in the war."[8]

1960sEdit

1970sEdit

  • September 29, 1972. Prime Minister Kakuei Tanaka. "The Japanese side is keenly conscious of the responsibility for the serious damage that Japan caused in the past to the Chinese people through war, and deeply reproaches itself. Further, the Japanese side reaffirms its position that it intends to realize the normalization of relations between the two countries from the stand of fully understanding 'the three principles for the restoration of relations' put forward by the Government of the People's Republic of China. The Chinese side expresses its welcome for this" (Joint Communique of the Government of Japan and the Government of the People's Republic of China).[9]

1980sEdit

  • August 24, 1982. Prime Minister Zenko Suzuki. "I am painfully aware of Japan's responsibility for inflicting serious damages [on Asian nations] during the past war." "We need to recognize that there are criticisms that condemn [Japan's occupation] as invasion" (Press Conference on Textbook issue).[10]
  • August 26, 1982. Chief Cabinet Secretary Kiichi Miyazawa. "1. The Japanese Government and the Japanese people are deeply aware of the fact that acts by our country in the past caused tremendous suffering and damage to the peoples of Asian countries, including the Republic of Korea (ROK) and China, and have followed the path of a pacifist state with remorse and determination that such acts must never be repeated. Japan has recognized, in the Japan-ROK Joint Communique, of 1965, that the 'past relations are regrettable, and Japan feels deep remorse,' and in the Japan-China Joint Communique, that Japan is 'keenly conscious of the responsibility for the serious damage that Japan caused in the past to the Chinese people through war and deeply reproaches itself.' These statements confirm Japan's remorse and determination which I stated above and this recognition has not changed at all to this day. 2. This spirit in the Japan-ROK Joint Communique, and the Japan-China Joint Communique, naturally should also be respected in Japan's school education and textbook authorization. Recently, however, the Republic of Korea, China, and others have been criticizing some descriptions in Japanese textbooks. From the perspective of building friendship and goodwill with neighboring countries, Japan will pay due attention to these criticisms and make corrections at the Government's responsibility. 3. To this end, in relation to future authorization of textbooks, the Government will revise the Guideline for Textbook Authorization after discussions in the Textbook Authorization and Research Council and give due consideration to the effect mentioned above. Regarding textbooks that have already been authorized, Government will take steps quickly to the same effect. As measures until then, the Minister of Education, Sports, Science and Culture will express his views and make sure that the idea mentioned in 2. Above is duly reflected in the places of education. 4. Japan intends to continue to make efforts to promote mutual understanding and develop friendly and cooperative relations with neighboring countries and to contribute to the peace and stability of Asia and, in turn, of the world"(Statement on History Textbooks).[11]
  • September 6, 1984. Emperor Hirohito. "It is indeed regrettable that there was an unfortunate past between us for a period in this century and I believe that it should not be repeated again." (Meeting with President Chun Doo Hwan.) [12]
  • September 7, 1984. Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone. "There was a period in this century when Japan brought to bear great sufferings upon your country and its people. I would like to state here that the government and people of Japan feel a deep regret for this error."[13]
  • October 23, 1985. Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone. "On June 6, 1945, when the UN Charter was signed in San Francisco, Japan was still fighting a senseless war with 40 nations. Since the end of the war, Japan has profoundly regretted the unleashing of rampant ultra nationalism and militarism and the war that brought great devastation to the people of many countries around the world and to our country as well" (Speech to the United Nations).
  • 1989. Prime Minister Takeshita Noboru. "As we have made clear previously at repeated opportunities, the Japanese government and the Japanese people are deeply conscious of the fact that the actions of our country in the past caused suffering and loss to many people in neighboring countries. Starting from our regret and resolve not to repeat such things a second time, we have followed a course as a "Peace Nation" since then. This awareness and regret should be emphasized especially in the relationship between our countries and the Korean peninsula, our nearest neighbors both geographically and historically. At this opportunity as we face a new situation in the Korean peninsula, again, to all peoples of the globe, concerning the relationship of the past, we want to express our deep regret and sorrow (Speech in the Japanese Diet).

1990sEdit

  • April 18, 1990. Minister of Foreign Affairs Taro Nakayama. "Japan is deeply sorry for the tragedy in which these (Korean) people were moved to Sakhalin not of their own free will but by the design of the Japanese government and had to remain there after the conclusion of the war" (188th National Diet Session Lower House Committee of Foreign Affairs).[14]
  • May 24, 1990. Emperor Akihito. "Reflecting upon the suffering that your people underwent during this unfortunate period, which was brought about by our nation, I cannot but feel the deepest remorse" (Meeting with President Roh Tae Woo).[15]
  • May 25, 1990. Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu. "I would like to take the opportunity here to humbly reflect upon how the people of the Korean Peninsula went through unbearable pain and sorrow as a result of our country's actions during a certain period in the past and to express that we are sorry" (Summit meeting with President Roh Tae Woo in Japan).[16]
  • January 1, 1992. Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa. "[Concerning the comfort women,] I apologize from the bottom of my heart and feel remorse for those people who suffered indescribable hardships" (Press conference).
  • January 16, 1992. Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa. "We the Japanese people, first and foremost, have to bear in our mind the fact that your people experienced unbearable suffering and sorrow during a certain period in the past because of our nation's act, and never forget the feeling of remorse. I, as a prime minister, would like to once again express a heartfelt remorse and apology to the people of your nation" (Speech at dinner with President Roh Tae Woo).[17]
  • January 17, 1992. Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa. "What we should not forget about relationship between our nation and your nation is a fact that there was a certain period in the thousands of years of our company when we were the victimizer and you were the victim. I would like to once again express a heartfelt remorse and apology for the unbearable suffering and sorrow that you experienced during this period because of our nation's act." Recently the issue of the so-called 'wartime comfort women' is being brought up. I think that incidents like this are seriously heartbreaking, and I am truly sorry" (Policy speech at the occasion of the visit to the Republic of Korea).[18]
  • July 6, 1992. Chief Cabinet Secretary Koichi Kato. "The Government again would like to express its sincere apology and remorse to all those who have suffered indescribable hardship as so-called 'wartime comfort women,' irrespective of their nationality or place of birth. With profound remorse and determination that such a mistake must never be repeated, Japan will maintain its stance as a pacifist nation and will endeavor to build up new future-oriented relations with the Republic of Korea and with other countries and regions in Asia. As I listen to many people, I feel truly grieved for this issue. By listening to the opinions of people from various directions, I would like to consider sincerely in what way we can express our feelings to those who suffered such hardship" (Statement by Chief Cabinet Secretary Koichi Kato on the Issue of the so-called "Wartime Comfort Women" from the Korean Peninsula).[19]
  • August 4, 1993. Chief Cabinet Secretary Yōhei Kōno. "Undeniably, this was an act, with the involvement of the military authorities of the day, that severely injured the honor and dignity of many women. The Government of Japan would like to take this opportunity once again to extend its sincere apologies and remorse to all those, irrespective of place of origin, who suffered immeasurable pain and incurable physical and psychological wounds as comfort women" (Statement by the Chief Cabinet Secretary Yohei Kono on the result of the study on the issue of "comfort women"),[20]
  • August 11, 1993. Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa. "I myself believe it was a war of aggression, a war that was wrong" (First Press Conference after inauguration).[21]
  • August 23, 1993. Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa. "After 48 years from then, our nation has become one of nations that enjoy prosperity and peace. We must not forget that it is founded on the ultimate sacrifices in the last war, and a product of the achievements of the people of the previous generations. We would like to take this opportunity to clearly express our remorse for the past and a new determination to the world. Firstly at this occasion, we would like to express our deep remorse and apology for the fact that invasion and colonial rule by our nation in the past brought to bear great sufferings and sorrow upon many people" (Speech at 127th National Diet Session).[22]
  • September 24, 1993. Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa. "I used the expression war of aggression and act of aggression to express honestly my recognition which is the same as the one that the act of our nation in the past brought to bear unbearable sufferings and sorrow upon many people, and to express once again deep remorse and apology" (128th National Diet Session).[23]
  • August 31, 1994. Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama. "Japan's actions in a certain period of the past not only claimed numerous victims here in Japan but also left the peoples of neighboring Asia and elsewhere with scars that are painful even today. I am thus taking this opportunity to state my belief, based on my profound remorse for these acts of aggression, colonial rule, and the like caused such unbearable suffering and sorrow for so many people, that Japan's future path should be one of making every effort to build world peace in line with my no-war commitment. It is imperative for us Japanese to look squarely to our history with the peoples of neighboring Asia and elsewhere. Only with solid basis of mutual understanding and confidence that can be build through overcoming the pain on both sides, can we and the peoples of neighboring countries together clear up the future of Asia-Pacific.... On the issue of wartime 'comfort women,' which seriously stained the honor and dignity of many women, I would like to take this opportunity once again to express my profound and sincere remorse and apologies. With regard to this issue as well, I believe that one way of demonstrating such feelings of apologies and remorse is to work to further promote mutual understanding with the countries and areas concerned as well as to face squarely to the past and ensure that it is rightly conveyed to future generations. This initiative, in this sense, has been drawn up consistent with such belief" (Statement by Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama on the "Peace, Friendship, and Exchange Initiative").[24]
  • June 9, 1995. House of Representatives, National Diet of Japan. "On the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the end of World War II, this House offers its sincere condolences to those who fell in action and victims of wars and similar actions all over the world. Solemnly reflecting upon many instances of colonial rule and acts of aggression in the modern history of the world, and recognizing that Japan carried out those acts in the past, inflicting pain and suffering upon the peoples of other countries, especially in Asia, the Members of this House express a sense of deep remorse" (Resolution to renew the determination for peace on the basis of lessons learned from history).[25]
  • July 1995. Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama. "The problem of the so-called wartime comfort women is one such scar, which, with the involvement of the Japanese military forces of the time, seriously stained the honor and dignity of many women. This is entirely inexcusable. I offer my profound apology to all those who, as wartime comfort women, suffered emotional and physical wounds that can never be closed" (Statement by Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama on the occasion of the establishment of the "Asian Women's Fund").[26]
  • August 15, 1995. Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama. "During a certain period in the not-too-distant past, Japan, through its colonial rule and aggression, caused tremendous damage and suffering to the people of many countries, particularly those of Asia. In the hope that no such mistake will be made in the future, I regard, in a spirit of humanity, these irrefutable facts of history, and express here once again my feelings of deep remorse and state my heartfelt apology" (Statement by Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama 'On the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the war's end').[27]
  • June 23, 1996. Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto. Hashimoto mentioned the aspects of Japan's colonial rule of the Korean Peninsula such as the forced Japanization of Korean people's name and commented "It is beyond imagination how this injured the hearts of Korean people" Hashimoto also touched on the issue of Korean comfort women and said "Nothing injured the honor and dignity of women more than this and I would like to extend words of deep remorse and the heartfelt apology" (Joint press conference at summit meeting with President Kim Young Sam in South Korea).[28]
  • October 8, 1996. Emperor Akihito. "There was a period when our nation brought to bear great sufferings upon the people of the Korean Peninsula." "The deep sorrow that I feel over this will never be forgotten" (Speech at dinner with President Kim Dae Jung of the Republic of Korea).[29]
  • August 28, 1997. Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto. "I believe that Japan has learned its lessons from history and that the people of Japan widely share the view that we must learn from the past for the future, without forgetting what is behind us. The year before last, former Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama issued these words: '... through its colonial rule and aggression, [Japan] caused tremendous damage and suffering to the people of many countries, particularly to those of Asian nations. ... I regard, in a spirit of humility, these irrefutable facts of history, and express here once again my feelings of deep remorse and state my heartfelt apology.' I am of the same mind as the former Prime Minister. Even though there are some elements in Japan that are quite capable of arousing Chinese sentiment with their rhetoric, Japan will not become a military power in the future. Our determination to continue treading the path of a peaceful nation is self-evident to us, the Japanese people. Still, however clear this may be to us, we must continue our persistent efforts so that China and the other nations of Asia have no reason to doubt us" (Speech by Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto, Seeking a New Foreign Policy Toward China).[30]
  • September 6, 1997. Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto. "In 1995, on the 50th anniversary of the end of World War II, the Government of Japan expressed its resolution through the statement by the Prime Minister, which states that during a certain period in the past, Japan's conduct caused tremendous damage and suffering to the people of many countries, including China, and the Prime Minister expressed his feeling of deep remorse and stated his heartfelt apology, while giving his word to make efforts for peace. I myself was one of the ministers who was involved in drafting this statement. I would like to repeat that this is the official position of the Government of Japan. During the summit meeting that I had during my visit to China, I have made this point very clear in a frank manner to the Chinese side. Premier Li Peng said that he concurs completely with my remarks" (Ministry of Foreign Affairs Press Conference on: Visit of Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto to the People's Republic of China).[31]
  • January 13, 1998. Press Secretary. "Statement by Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto on World War II prisoners of war. Q: At the meeting last night with Prime Minister Blair, did Prime Minister Hashimoto really apologize for the prisoners of war. Spokesman Hashimoto: The important thing is that the Prime Minister of Japan expressed the feelings of deep remorse and stated heartfelt apologies to the people who suffered in World War II directly to the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. This was the second meeting between Prime Minister Hashimoto and Prime Minister Blair and we considered the meeting very important, especially this year. Making use of this opportunity, Prime Minister Hashimoto expressed his remorse and apology on behalf of the Government of Japan; this is very important. Prime Minister Blair fully understands the importance of the statement made by Prime Minister Hashimoto on this issue. His press opportunities after the talks objectively reflect what the two gentlemen talked about" (Press Conference by the Press Secretary).[32]
  • January 16, 1998. Press Secretary. "Apology to prisoners of war. Q: This week, Prime Minister Hashimoto apologized to British prisoners of war for actions taken during World War II. Does the Japanese Government have any plans to extend that apology to Australian prisoners of war, and if not, why not? Spokesman Tanaka: Our sense of apology and our sense of remorse was addressed to all the countries which have gone through the experiences of the last world war. You may recall that, at the time of the 50th anniversary of World War II, then-Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama issued a statement by the Government of Japan to express its sincere feeling of deep remorse and heartfelt apology for the damages and suffering for the one-time past of Japan. This apology was addressed universally. Since the time of this apology, Prime Minister Tony Blair of the United Kingdom has been elected to his current position and has just concluded a visit to Japan. Therefore, we took the opportunity of this recent visit to once again express our feeling, so that this new bilateral relationship would be cemented in the future. Please be reminded that our apology is extended to all the countries who shared the same disastrous experiences. Q: So, are you saying that Prime Minister Hashimoto's statement from this week was just a restatement of what then-Prime Minister Murayama said on the 50th anniversary? Spokesman Tanaka: No, it is not really a restatement, but a new determination. Every time we make this type of statement, it is our expression of a new determination to build a new era together with other countries, particularly this time with Prime Minister Tony Blair, who is a young, fresh face in the international community and who has shown sufficient capability to lead that country and Europe into the 21st century. So, we wanted to share with him our perception for the new era. Q: So, you do not see a need to extend that apology to particular countries? Spokesman Tanaka: Whenever the opportunity arises and whenever necessary, we do not hesitate to renew our determination" (Press Conference by the Press Secretary).[33]
  • July 15, 1998. Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto. "The Government of Japan, painfully aware of its moral responsibility concerning the issue of so called "wartime comfort women," has been sincerely addressing this issue in close cooperation with the Asian Women's Fund which implements the projects to express the national atonement on this issue. Recognizing that the issue of comfort women, with an involvement of the Japanese military authorities at that time, was a grave affront to the honor and dignity of large numbers of women, I would like to convey to Your Excellency my most sincere apologies and remorse to all the women who underwent immeasurable and painful experiences and suffered incurable physical and psychological wounds as comfort women.... By the Statement of Prime Minister in 1995, the Government of Japan renewed the feelings of deep remorse and the heartfelt apology for tremendous damage and suffering caused by Japan to the people of many countries including the Netherlands during a certain period in the past. My cabinet has not modified this position at all, and I myself laid a wreath to the Indisch Monument with these feelings on the occasion of my visit to the Netherlands in June last year" (The contents of the letter of the then Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto sent to the Netherlands Prime Minister Willem Kok).[34]
  • October 8, 1998. Prime Minister Keizō Obuchi. "Looking back on the relations between Japan and the Republic of Korea during this century, Prime Minister Obuchi regarded in a spirit of humility the fact of history that Japan caused, during a certain period in the past, tremendous damage and suffering to the people of the Republic of Korea through its colonial rule, and expressed his deep remorse and heartfelt apology for this fact. President Kim accepted with sincerity this statement of Prime Minister Obuchi's recognition of history and expressed his appreciation for it. He also expressed his view that the present calls upon both countries to overcome their unfortunate history and to build a future-oriented relationship based on reconciliation as well as good-neighborly and friendly cooperation" (Japan-Republic of Korea Joint Declaration A New Japan-Republic of Korea Partnership towards the Twenty-first Century).[35]
  • November 26, 1998. Prime Minister Keizō Obuchi. "Both sides believe that squarely facing the past and correctly understanding history are the important foundation for further developing relations between Japan and China. The Japanese side observes the 1972 Joint Communique of the Government of Japan and the Government of the People's Republic of China and the August 15, 1995 Statement by former Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama. The Japanese side is keenly conscious of the responsibility for the serious distress and damage that Japan caused to the Chinese people through its aggression against China during a certain period in the past and expressed deep remorse for this. The Chinese side hopes that the Japanese side will learn lessons from the history and adhere to the path of peace and development. Based on this, both sides will develop long-standing relations of friendship" (Japan-China Joint Declaration On Building a Partnership of Friendship and Cooperation for Peace and Development).[36]

2000sEdit

  • August 10, 2000. Consul-General of Japan in Hong Kong Itaru Umezu. "In fact, Japan has clearly and repeatedly expressed its sincere remorse and apologies, and has dealt sincerely with reparation issues. These apologies were irrefutably expressed, in particular in Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama's official statement in 1995, which was based on a cabinet decision and which has subsequently been upheld by successive prime ministers, including Prime Minister Yoshirō Mori. Mr. Murayama said that Japan 'through its colonial rule and aggression, caused tremendous damage and suffering to the people of many countries, particularly to those of Asian nations. In the hope that no such mistake be made in the future, I regard, in a spirit of humility, these irrefutable facts of history, and express here once again my feelings of deep remorse and state my heartfelt apology'" (Japan Has Faced Its Past. Far Eastern Economic Review, August 10, 2000).[37]
  • August 17, 2000. Spokesman for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan Ryuichiro Yamazaki. "The fact is that Japan has repeatedly expressed its remorse and stated its apology for wartime actions with the utmost clarity. A notable example is then Prime Minister's official statement in August 1995, based upon a Cabinet decision. In the statement, Mr. Murayama said that Japan 'through its colonial rule and aggression, caused tremendous damage and suffering to the people of many countries, particularly to those of Asian nations,' and he expressed his 'feelings of deep remorse' and stated his 'heartfelt apology.' As recently as 1998, then Prime Minister Keizō Obuchi reiterated gist of this statement to Chinese President Jiang Zeming when he paid a state visit to Japan" (Letter written in response to the article "Miffed Chinese Sue Japan Companies" in The New York Times on August 7, 2000).[38]
  • August 30, 2000. Minister for Foreign Affairs Yōhei Kōno. "I believe that Japan's perception of history was clearly set out in the Statement by Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama issued, following a Cabinet Decision, on the fiftieth anniversary of the end of World War II. As a member of the Cabinet, I participated in the drafting of that Statement. The spirit contained therein has been carried forth by successive administrations and is now the common view of the large number of Japanese people" (Address by Minister for Foreign Affairs Yōhei Kōno During His Visit to the People's Republic of China).[39]
  • April 3, 2001. Chief Cabinet Secretary Yasuo Fukuda. "Japan humbly accepts that for a period in the not too distant past, it caused tremendous damage and suffering to the people of many countries, particularly to those of Asian nations, through its colonial rule and aggression, and expresses its deep remorse and heartfelt apology for this. Such recognition has been succeeded by subsequent Cabinets and there is no change regarding this point in the present Cabinet" (Comments by the Chief Cabinet Secretary, Yasuo Fukuda on the history textbooks to be used in junior high schools from 2002).[40]
  • September 8, 2001. Minister for Foreign Affairs Makiko Tanaka. "We have never forgotten that Japan caused tremendous damage and suffering to the people of many countries during the last war. Many lost their precious lives and many were wounded. The war has left an incurable scar on many people, including former prisoners of war. Facing these facts of history in a spirit of humility, I reaffirm today our feelings of deep remorse and heartfelt apology expressed in the Prime Minister Murayama's statement of 1995" (Speech by Minister for Foreign Affairs Makiko Tanaka at the Ceremony in Commemoration of 50th anniversary of the Signing of the San Francisco Peace Treaty).[41]
  • October 15, 2001. Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi. "During the talks, President Kim highly appreciated the words of the Prime Minister Koizumi at Sodaemun Independence Park, in which he expressed remorse and apology for Japan's colonial domination" (Prime Minister Visits the Republic of Korea).[42]
  • 2001. Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi (Also signed by all the prime ministers since 1995, including Ryutaro Hashimoto, Keizō Obuchi, Yoshirō Mori). "As Prime Minister of Japan, I thus extend anew my most sincere apologies and remorse to all the women who underwent immeasurable and painful experiences and suffered incurable physical and psychological wounds as comfort women. We must not evade the weight of the past, nor should we evade our responsibilities for the future. I believe that our country, painfully aware of its moral responsibilities, with feelings of apology and remorse, should face up squarely to its past history and accurately convey it to future generations" (Letter from Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi to the former comfort women).[43]
  • September 17, 2002. Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi. "The Japanese side regards, in a spirit of humility, the facts of history that Japan caused tremendous damage and suffering to the people of Korea through its colonial rule in the past, and expressed deep remorse and heartfelt apology" (Japan-DPRK Pyongyang Declaration).[44]
  • August 15, 2003. Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi. "During the war, Japan caused tremendous damage and suffering to the people of many countries, particularly to those of Asian nations. On behalf of the people of Japan, I hereby renew my feelings of profound remorse as I express my sincere mourning to the victims" (Address by Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi at the 58th Memorial Ceremony for the War Dead).[45]
  • April 22, 2005. Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi. "Japan squarely faces these facts of history in a spirit of humility. And with feelings of deep remorse and heartfelt apology always engraved in mind, Japan has resolutely maintained, consistently since the end of World War II, never turning into a military power but an economic power, its principle of resolving all matters by peaceful means, without recourse to use of force. Japan once again states its resolve to contribute to the peace and prosperity of the world in the future as well, prizing the relationship of trust it enjoys with the nations of the world." (Address by the Prime Minister of Japan at the Asia-African Summit 2005).[46]
  • August 15, 2005. Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi. "In the past, Japan, through its colonial rule and aggression, caused tremendous damage and suffering to the people of many countries, particularly to those of Asian nations. Sincerely facing these facts of history, I once again express my feelings of deep remorse and heartfelt apology, and also express the feelings of mourning for all victims, both at home and abroad, in the war. I am determined not to allow the lessons of that horrible war to erode, and to contribute to the peace and prosperity of the world without ever again waging a war."[47]
  • May 9, 2009. The Japanese government apologized through its ambassador in the U.S. to former American prisoners of war who suffered in the Bataan Death March.[48]

2010sEdit

  • February 11, 2010. Foreign Minister Katsuya Okada. "I believe what happened 100 years ago deprived Koreans of their country and national pride. I can understand the feelings of the people who lost their country and had their pride wounded," Okada said during a joint news conference with South Korean Foreign Minister Yu Myung-hwan. (This was a statement marking the 100th anniversary of Japan's colonial annexation of Korea, and not in reference to Japan's war acts in particular.)[49]
  • August 10, 2010. Prime Minister Naoto Kan expressed "deep regret over the suffering inflicted" during Japan's colonial rule over Korea. Japan's Kyodo News also reported that Cabinet members endorsed the statement. In addition, Kan said that Japan will hand over precious cultural artifacts that South Korea has been demanding. Among them are records of an ancient Korean royal dynasty[50] The South Korean government, however, only "took note" of the apology, and did not accept it.[51][52]
  • September 13, 2010. Foreign Minister Katsuya Okada apologized to a group of six former American soldiers who during World War II were held as prisoners of war by the Japanese, including 90-year-old Lester Tenney, a survivor of the Bataan Death March in 1942. The six and their families and the families of two deceased soldiers were invited to visit Japan at the expense of the Japanese government in a program that will see more American former prisoners of war and former prisoners of war from other countries visit Japan in the future.[53]
  • December 7, 2010. Prime Minister Naoto Kan apologized for Korea's suffering under colonization as part of a statement marking the 100th anniversary of the annexation in 1910. "I express a renewed feeling of deep remorse and state my heartfelt apology for the tremendous damage and suffering caused by colonial rule," Kan said. Kan said Japan colonized Korea "against the will of the Korean people" who suffered great damage to their national pride and loss of culture and sovereignty as a result and added that he wants to take an honest look at his country's past with the courage and humility to address its history. [54]

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. U.S. National Archives and Records Administration: Japanese surrender document. September 2, 1945.
  2. "Honesty, not apology," The Economist (US). August 21, 1993.
  3. Bix, Herbert P. (2000). Hirohito and the Making of Modern Japan, p. 545.
  4. http://joongangdaily.joins.com/article/view.asp?aid=2925061
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 "MacArthur aide: U.S. must learn from errors," Salt Lake Tribune. December 7, 2006.
  6. Lind, Jennifer. "The Perils of Apology: What Japan Shouldn't Learn from Germany," Foreign Affairs. May/June 2009; Ayako Doi, Letter to the editor: "It's Never too Late to Say You're Sorry," Foreign Affairs. September/October 2009.
  7. Fujita Yukihisa. "Prime Minister Kishi's Diplomacy of Reconciliation," Japan Echo. August 2006.
  8. http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,893786,00.html
  9. Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan (MOFA): "Joint Communique of the Government of Japan and the Government of the People's Republic of China," September 29, 1972.
  10. qtd. in Tahara, Soichiro (田原総一朗). Nihon no Senso (日本の戦争). Shogakkan, 2000: Tokyo, Japan. p. 161.
  11. MOFA: "Statement by Chief Cabinet Secretary Kiichi Miyazawa on History Textbooks," August 26, 1982.
  12. "Japan: Ritual of Reconciliation," Time. September 17, 1984.
  13. The Economist, September 15, 1984
  14. qtd. in Kenichi Takagi, Rethinking Japan's Postwar Compensation: Voices of Victims. tr. by Makiko Nakano. Retrieved from http://home.att.ne.jp/sun/RUR55/E/epage16.htm
  15. Nakano Bukno Template:En icon (Nakano Library): 宮中晩餐会での今上天皇の盧泰愚大統領歓迎の勅語 ("Your words of welcome dinner President Roh Tae Woo, South Korea" Template:En icon). May 24, 1990.
  16. 大韓民国大統領盧泰愚閣下ご夫妻歓迎晩餐会での海部内閣総理大臣の挨拶. 海部演説集 pp. 326–328. qtd in The World and Japan Database Project website, Institute of Oriental Culture, University of Tokyo. Retrieved from http://www.ioc.u-tokyo.ac.jp/~worldjpn/documents/texts/JPKR/19900525.S1J.html
  17. 大韓民国大統領盧泰愚閣下ご夫妻主催晩餐会での宮澤内閣総理大臣のスピーチ. 宮澤演説集 pp. 89–91. qtd in The World and Japan Database Project website, Institute of Oriental Culture, University of Tokyo. Retrieved from http://www.ioc.u-tokyo.ac.jp/~worldjpn/documents/texts/JPKR/19920116.S1J.html
  18. 宮澤喜一内閣総理大臣の大韓民国訪問における政策演説(アジアのなか、世界のなかの日韓関係). 外交青書36号,383–388. qtd in The World and Japan Database Project website, Institute of Oriental Culture, University of Tokyo. Retrieved from http://www.ioc.u-tokyo.ac.jp/~worldjpn/documents/texts/exdpm/19920117.S1J.html
  19. MOFA: "Statement by Chief Cabinet Secretary Koichi Kato on the Issue of the so-called 'Wartime Comfort Women' from the Korean Peninsula," July 6, 1992.
  20. MOFA: "Statement by the Chief Cabinet Secretary Yohei Kono on the result of the study on the issue of 'Ccomfort Women'," August 4, 1993.
  21. qtd. in Margot S. Strom, Facing History and Ourselves: Holocaust and Human Behavior. p. 488).
  22. 第127回国会(特別会)細川護熙内閣総理大臣 所信表明演説. (The World and Japan Database Project website, Institute of Oriental Culture, University of Tokyo). Retrieved from http://www.ioc.u-tokyo.ac.jp/~worldjpn/documents/texts/pm/19930823.SWJ.html
  23. 第128回国会. (国会会議録検索システム (National Diet Conference Minutes Search system)). Retrieved from http://kokkai.ndl.go.jp
  24. MOFA: "Statement by Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama on the 'Peace, Friendship, and Exchange Initiative," August 31, 1994.
  25. MOFA: "Prime Minister's Address to the Diet: 'Resolution to Renew the Determination for Peace on the Basis of Lessons Learned from History'," June 9, 1995.
  26. MOFA: "Statement by Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama on the occasion of the establishment of the 'Asian Women's Fund'," July 1995.
  27. MOFA: "Statement by Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama 'On the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the war's end'," August 15, 1995.
  28. Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet (PM/Kantei): 日韓共同記者会見(橋本総理大臣・金泳三大統領共同記者会見, June 23, 1996.
  29. Nakano Library: 宮中晩餐会での今上天皇の金大中大統領歓迎の勅語 ("Court banquet speech welcoming South Korea President Kim Dae" Template:En icon). October 8, 1996.
  30. MOFA: "Speech by Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto – Seeking a New Foreign Policy Toward China," August 28, 1997.
  31. MOFA: "Ministry of Foreign Affairs Press Conference on Visit of Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto to the People's Republic of China," September 6, 1997.
  32. MOFA: "Press Conference by the Press Secretary, Statement by Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto on World War II Prisoners of War," January 13, 1998.
  33. MOFA: "Press Conference by the Press Secretary, Apology to Prisoners of War," January 16, 1998.
  34. MOFA: "The Contents of the Letter of the then-Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto Sent to the Netherlands Prime Minister Willem Kok," July 15, 1998.
  35. MOFA: "Japan-Republic of Korea Joint Declaration, A New Japan-Republic of Korea Partnership towards the Twenty-first Century," October 8, 1998.
  36. MOFA: "Japan-China Joint Declaration On Building a Partnership of Friendship and Cooperation for Peace and Development," November 26, 1998.
  37. MOFA: Itaru Umezu. "Japan Has Faced Its Past," Far Eastern Economic Review. August 10, 2000.
  38. MOFA: Ryuichiro Yamazaki. "Letter written in response to the article 'Miffed Chinese Sue Japan Companies' in New York Times on August 7, 2000"; Smith, Craig S. "Miffed Chinese Sue Japan Companies," New York Times. August 7, 2000; Ryuichiro Yamazaki. Letter to the editor: "Japan's Apology," New York Times. August 17, 2000.
  39. MOFA: "Address by Minister for Foreign Affairs Yōhei Kōno During His Visit to the People's Republic of China Seeking a True Partnership of Friendship and Cooperation," August 30, 2000.
  40. MOFA: "Comments by the Chief Cabinet Secretary, Mr. Yasuo Fukuda on the history textbooks to be used in junior high schools from 2002," April 3, 2001.
  41. MOFA: "Speech by Minister for Foreign Affairs Makiko Tanaka at the Ceremony in Commemoration of 50th anniversary of the Signing of the San Francisco Peace Treaty," September 8, 2001.
  42. PM/Kantei: "Prime Minister Koizumi Presents Flowers at the Commemorative Monument in Sodaemun Independence Park," October 15, 2001.
  43. MOFA: "Letter from Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi to the former comfort women," 2001.
  44. MOFA: "Japan-DPRK Pyongyang Declaration," September 17, 2002.
  45. PM/Kantei: "Address by Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi at the 58th Memorial Ceremony for the War Dead," August 15, 2003.
  46. PM/Kantei: "Speech by H.E. Mr. Junichiro Koizumi, Prime Minister of Japan," April 22, 2005.
  47. PM/Kantei: "Statement by Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi, On the 60th Anniversary of the End of the War," August 15, 2005
  48. Nakamae, Hiroshi. "Japan Apologizes To American POWs Who Suffered In Bataan Death March," Nikkei Weekly Online. May 10, 2009.
  49. "Japanese FM Offers Apology for Colonial Rule," The Korea Times. February 11, 2010.
  50. "Japan apologizes again for colonizing Korea" Hangul CNN News. August 10, 2010.
  51. Thủ tướng Nhật xin lỗi thuộc địa cũ Template:Vi
  52. http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5jY6EsXG4QM6RldO9IEOc8_9-QvAwD9HLKUJO0
  53. http://web.archive.org/web/20100913154025/http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fgw-us-japan-pow-20100913,0,7678158.story Associated Press via the Los Angeles Times
  54. http://english.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2010/08/11/2010081101050.html

ReferencesEdit

External links Edit

zh:日本政府就战争道歉发言列表

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.